Testimony of Mrs. Marie Louise Hooper (New York, 29 May 1967)

REPORT OF THE AD HOC WORKING GROUP OF EXPERTS SET UP UNDER RESOLUTION 2 (XXIII) OF THE COMMISSION ON HUMAN RIGHTS
by United Nations
with Mary-Louise Hooper
New York, New York, United States
October 27, 1967
24 pages
Type: Testimony
Coverage in Africa: South Africa, Tanzania
Coverage outside Africa: United States, United Nations
Language: English
Testimony of Mary-Louise Hooper, Director of the South Africa Program of the American Committee on Africa, before the Ad Hoc Working Group of Experts Set Up Under Resolution 2 (XXIII) of the Commission on Human Rights. Hooper discusses her work in South Africa with the African National Congress (ANC). She explains her belief in authenticity of statements and affidavits of police brutality and torture in South African prisons that were included with the March 3, 1964 letter from George Houser, Director of the American Committee on Africa to the Chairman of the Special Committee on the Policies of Apartheid of the Government of the Republic of South Africa. She submitted a copy of a statement by Abdulhay Jassat about his abuse and torture in prison, which he gave to her after his escape from South Africa. Looper has received similar affidavits and statements submitted to her by Ruth First, who is now in London, and from some of her associates, who are presently incarcerated in South African prisons. Hooper submits copies of four additional statements from former prisoners, which she received in 1963 and 1964. Hooper also testified about her brief experience in “the fort” in Johannesburg, which is a famous prison. When she was out of her cell on exercise, she talked with African women, some of whom were wives of Hooper’s political associates in the African National Congress; they described being cold, underfed and generally mistreated in prison and reported that beating, especially of the men, took place for little or no reason. [This document was scanned by the United Nations that provided it to the African Activist Archive Project. It is an excerpt from the full 420-page report.]
Collection: Dag Hammarskjöld Library