THE GENEVA CONVENTIONS OF 1949 AND THE STATUS OF POLITICAL PRISONERS IN SOUTH AFRICA

by Gay Johnson McDougall
New York, New York, United States
March 26, 1980
11 pages
Type: Testimony
Coverage in Africa: South Africa
Coverage outside Africa: United States, United Nations
Language: English
Testimony of Gay Johnson McDougall, Attorney at Law, before the United Nations Special Committee Against Apartheid. McDougall discusses "Political Trials in South Africa: 1976-1979" by Glenn Moss, Bantu Education, Bantu Administration Board Institutions, small shopkeepers that exploit township dwellers, military and political training, the trained guerrilla fighter, arms, explosives and ammunition, a traditional war situation, belligerents captured by the enemy, the Geneva Convention of 1949 Relative to the Treatment of Prisoners of War, humane treatment during captivity, colonial and racist regimes, armed conflicts, fighting against colonial domination, liberation movements, the right to self-determination, political prisoners, fighting forces, laws and customs of war, terrorists, International law, the international character of the conflict in South Africa, self-determination, non-discrimination based on race, the United Nations Charter, the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples, the Declaration on Principles of International Law Concerning Friendly Relations and Cooperation among States in Accordance with the Charter of the United Nations, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the International Covenants on Human Rights, the U.N. General Assembly and Security Council, trials of prisoners accused of guerrilla activities, the African National Congress (ANC), the Pan Africanist Congress (PAC), munitions, Naledi Tsiki, terrorism, and world opinion.
Used by permission of Gay McDougall.
Collection: Elizabeth S. Landis collection, National Archives of Namibia