QUESTIONS ABOUT RHODESIAN CHROME AND THE UNITED STATES VIOLATIONS OF U.N. SANCTIONS

by American Committee on Africa
New York, New York, United States
March 17, 1972
3 pages
Type: Report
Coverage in Africa: South Africa, Zimbabwe
Coverage outside Africa: United States, Portugal, United Kingdom, United Nations
Language: English
Report in question and answer format about the importation of chrome and other materials from Rhodesia (Zimbabwe) in defiance of U.N. sanctions. The report says by allowing the importation of chrome and other minerals in open defiance of U.N. sanctions, the U.S. gives economic and political support to the Ian Smith regime and the continuation of minority rule. The report says after months of lobbying last year by the Union Carbide Corporation and the Foote Mineral Company, which both own chrome ore mines in Rhodesia, Congress passed the Byrd amendment to the military procurement bill, allowing the import of any strategic material from a non-communist country. The report says already there have been protests by 300 Black students in Baton Rouge, Louisiana (where the first ship is supposed to dock) organized by the Committee of Blacks Against Oppression there. The report says the U.S. joins only South Africa and Portugal as the open violators of the sanctions; Japan, France, West German, and Italy have been accused of indirect trafficking with Rhodesia. The report asks groups and individuals to support local actions in their area protesting shipments from Rhodesia and calling for U.S. adherence to sanctions. The report asks groups and individuals to contact the White House and their Senators and Congressman calling for action to repeal the Byrd amendment. The report discusses the Nixon Administration, the Coalition for Rhodesian Sanctions, Americans for Democratic Action, the Soviet Union, Bishop Abel Muzorewa, the African National Council, the Office of Emergency Preparedness, and the United Nations Security Council.
Used by permission Africa Action (successor to the American Committee on Africa).
Collection: George M. Houser (Africa collection), Michigan State University Libraries Special Collections