NEW STRATEGIES FOR INTERNATIONAL ACTION AGAINST TRANSNATIONAL CORPORATE COLLABORATION WITH APARTHEID

Notes and Documents
(SEM. 4/79 INTERNATIONAL SEMINAR ON THE ROLE OF TRANSNATIONAL CORPORATIONS IN SOUTH AFRICA London, 2-4 November 1979)
by Prexy Nesbitt, Centre Against Apartheid
New York, New York, United States
November 1979
Publisher: United Nations
15 pages
Type: Report
Coverage in Africa: South Africa, Nigeria
Coverage outside Africa: United States, France, United Nations
Language: English
Paper published at the request of the Special Committee against Apartheid, prepared by Mr. Nesbitt, formerly Director of the Africa Project at the Institute for Policy Studies, Washington, D.C. and national Co-ordinator of the Campaign to Oppose Bank Loans to South Africa (New York). The paper says the work of anti-apartheid groups throughout the world is presently at a critical juncture; there is no doubt that the last several years have seen a growth, both quantitatively and qualitatively, in the work of anti-apartheid and solidarity activists everywhere; in November 1978, a tremendous organizing effort led students throughout the state of California to march and picket more than five hundred branches of the Bank of America – a transnational lending institution which had loaned over 188 million dollars to South African entities. The paper says transnational corporations and Western capitalist Governments continue to play an increasingly critical role in keeping the apartheid regime afloat. The paper says pamphlets issued during that period by Alphaeus Hunton, W. E. B. DuBois, Paul Robeson and the Council on African Affairs, there went out a resounding cry for international action against banks then making loans to South Africa especially after the new Nationalist Government came to power in 1948. The paper says in 1976, 1977 and early 1978 - as the Soweto struggle sharpened, as the students' school boycotts, the ensuing trials, arrests and deaths all grew - more and more campuses activated towards the objectives of cutting their schools' financial linkages to South Africa. The paper reports n March of 1978, the Nigerian Government ordered all public sector agencies to close their accounts with Barclay's Bank of Nigeria because of the parent Barclay's large portfolio of credit to South Africa. The paper discusses Senator Dick Clark, Bank of America, the United Nations Economic and Social Council, transnational corporations (TNCs), Motorola Company, the Ford Motor Company, National Security Advisor Zbigniew Brezinski, Carter Administration, South African Minister Roelof Botha, Lucy Mvubelo, Helen Suzman, Gatsha Buthelezi, Nicholas Wiehahn, and Pieter Koornhof. Contents: Introduction • Role of the anti-apartheid movement • The "divestment" movement • Shareholder "activism" • New strategies • International co-operation • Future activities • Conclusion