ANTI-APARTHEID ACTIVITIES IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA A rising tide

Notes and Documents
(32/77)
by Prexy Nesbitt, American Committee on Africa, United Nations Centre Against Apartheid
New York, New York, United States
December 1977
Publisher: United Nations
13 pages
This document is testimony before the Special Committee Against Apartheid by Prexy Nesbitt, Associate Director of the American Committee on Africa and Co-ordinator of the Committee to Oppose Bank Loans to South Africa (COBLSA). U.S. anti-apartheid organizations that are mentioned (not including the list in the appendix of organizations participating in COBLSA), include: Ad Hoc Committee to Stop the United States-South Africa Davis Cup Match, African Liberation Support Committee (ALSC), All African People’s Revolutionary Party (AAPRP), American Coordinating Committee for Equality in Sport and Society (ACCESS), American Friends Service Committee, Emergency Coalition for Human Rights in South Africa, Interfaith Center on Corporate Responsibility (ICCR), Mozambique Film Project, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), National Committee of Black Churchmen, National Council of Negro Women, Patrice Lumumba Coalition, and People United to Save Humanity (PUSH). Anti-apartheid organizations outside the United States mentioned include: World Council of Church, End Loans to South Africa (ELTSA), and Toronto Committee for the Liberation of Southern Africa (TCLSA). • Growing solidarity of the black community in the United States with liberation in southern Africa • Church action against economic collaboration • Campaign against apartheid by liberation support groups • Four campaigns against apartheid • a) University divestment campaign • b) Krugerrand campaigns • c) Sports boycott • d) Bank campaign • The special role of organized labor • Annex, Committee to Oppose Bank Loans to South Africa, Participating Organizations
Used by permission of Africa Action (successor to the American Committee on Africa).
Collection: Private collection of David Wiley and Christine Root