Apartheid in Practice: Law & Order in South Africa

Apartheid in Practice: Law & Order in South Africa

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by Anti-Apartheid Movement,Design: David King
London, United Kingdom
1977
Publisher: Anti-Apartheid Movement, United Nations Centre Against Apartheid
Type: Poster
Coverage in Africa: South Africa
Coverage outside Africa: United Kingdom
Language: English
The political organizations of the Black majority have been banned and non-racial political organisations are illegal. Leaders of the Black people have been imprisoned, detained, forced into exile or underground activity. During 1976 alone, nearly 5000 people were detained; many for long periods without trial. All Africans over the age of 15 must carry a pass which controls where they live, work and whether they can travel within the country. During the last 25 years, 11 million Africans have been arrested under the pass laws; on average 1000 are arrested every day. In South Africa, white domination operates in all spheres. Only whites can vote, all members of parliament, all government ministers, all senior civil servants and all judges are white. Apartheid in practice means separate and unequal. This is why apartheid is unpopular, unjust and why the majority oppose it. To enforce apartheid, a battery of security laws exist which enables the government and police to ban organisations, imprison, detain without trial, restrict and ban opponents. When blacks protest, the police shoot first – as they did in Sharpeville and Soweto.
Poster describing how apartheid deprived black South Africans of all political rights and abrogated the rule of law. It shows Hector Pieterson, the first student to be shot dead by police in the 1976 Soweto uprising. This poster is one of a set of five designed for the Anti-Apartheid Movement (AAM) by David King. Others in the series focused on Land, Education, Health & Housing and Jobs & Wages.
Used by permission of David King and the Anti-Apartheid Movement Archives Committee.
Collection: Anti-Apartheid Movement Archives, Bodleian Library of Commonwealth and African Studies at Rhodes House, Oxford University, Oxford, UK