Apartheid in Practice: Health & Housing in South Africa

Apartheid in Practice: Health & Housing in South Africa

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by Anti-Apartheid Movement,Design: David King
London, United Kingdom
1977
Publisher: Anti-Apartheid Movement, United Nations Centre Against Apartheid
Type: Poster
Coverage in Africa: South Africa
Coverage outside Africa: United Kingdom
Language: English
There is one doctor for every 400 whites – and one for every 44,000 Africans. Life expectancy for whites is 15 to 20 years longer than Africans. Infant mortality rates for infants in rural areas are frightening – in some areas is it estimated that between one third and one half of all African children die before reaching the age of five. Malnutrition and appalling social conditions contribute to the bad health amongst the African population. In contrast, whites live in luxury – most households have at least one servant, and many have their own swimming pool. African and Coloured people live in temporary shacks lacking light, water and drainage. In the African townships the government-built houses also lack these amenities. Huge dormitory towns like Soweto (population over one million) have hardly any street lighting, telephones, supermarkets, cinema or sporting facilities. Segregation has been enforced – over a quarter million Coloureds and Indians have been compulsorily moved without compensation.
Poster about discrimination in health provision and housing, and infant mortality rates under apartheid. This poster is one of a set of five designed for the Anti-Apartheid Movement (AAM) by David King. Others in the series focused on Land, Education, Law & Order and Jobs & Wages.
Used by permission of David King and the Anti-Apartheid Movement Archives Committee.
Collection: Anti-Apartheid Movement Archives, Bodleian Library of Commonwealth and African Studies at Rhodes House, Oxford University, Oxford, UK