Apartheid in Practice: Land in South Africa

Apartheid in Practice: Land in South Africa

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by Anti-Apartheid Movement,Design: David King
London, United Kingdom
1977
Publisher: Anti-Apartheid Movement, United Nations Centre Against Apartheid
Type: Poster
Coverage in Africa: South Africa
Coverage outside Africa: United Kingdom
Language: English
87% of the land is reserved for whites. The Africans are divided into ten tribal categories which are allocated only13% of the land – the so-called Bantustans. At least two million Africans have been forced to ‘resettle’ in the Bantustans. The South African government’s apartheid policy is designed to make the Bantustans a substitute for African rights in the country as a whole and a pool of cheap labour. In the towns, cities and white farming areas, Africans form the bulk of the labour force but are treated as foreigners with no political rights of permanent rights of residence. Family life is disrupted; insecurity, humiliation and hardship are widespread. Blacks are segregated from whites not only territorially but residentially, physically and in many other ways.
Poster showing how under apartheid 87 per cent of South Africa's land was reserved for whites and Africans were crowded into the Bantustans to form a pool of cheap labor. This poster is one of a set of five designed for the Anti-Apartheid Movement (AAM) by David King. Others in the series focused on Law & Order, Education, Health & Housing and Jobs & Wages.
Used by permission of David King and the Anti-Apartheid Movement Archives Committee.
Collection: Anti-Apartheid Movement Archives, Bodleian Library of Commonwealth and African Studies at Rhodes House, Oxford University, Oxford, UK