The South African Trade and International Sanctions

by Alvin W. Wolfe
Washington, DC
March 22, 1965
Publisher: Consultative Council on South Africa
11 pages
Wolfe’s paper presented at the National Conference: The South African Crisis and American Action held in Washington, D.C, argues that the patterns of South Africa’s international trade make internationally organized economic isolation a possible means of effecting political change in South Africa. Economic sanctions are the only non-violent option. The longer such a step is delayed, the more difficult will be the task, not only because South Africa's economic growth enhances its self-sufficiency but also because its economic growth gives the government more means to further repress the majority population. • The Relationship of the Republic of South Africa to the Rest of Africa • Relations between South Africa and Developed Countries • The Position of Private Firms in the South African Trade • Conclusion • Bibliography
This item was digitized for Aluka, which made it available to the African Activist Archive.
See: http://www.aluka.org/
Used by permission of Africa Action (successor to the American Committee on Africa which was a member of the Consultative Council on South Africa and the Secretariat of the Council).
Collection: Africa Action Archive