The Student Coalition Against Apartheid and Racism

WHY AMERICAN YOUTH AND STUDENTS SHOULD OPPOSE APARTHEID AND FIGHT FOR THE TOTAL ISOLATION OF SOUTH AFRICA
by Student Coalition Against Apartheid and Racism
Washington, DC, United States
February 1, 1985
3 pages
Type: Leaflet
Coverage in Africa: South Africa
Coverage outside Africa: United States
Language: English
Statement issued as a leaflet at Student and Youth Day anti-apartheid protest at the South African Embassy, marking the 25th Anniversary of the Student Sit-in Movement. The leaflet acknowledges the sacrifice and commitment by the four original students (David Richmond, Frank McKain, Joe McNeil, Ezell Blair Jr. /Jabarel Khazen) and countless others. Black, White, Asian, Hispanic, and Caribbean students, who are the beneficiaries of this sacrifice, stand today in front of the South African Embassy, the embodiment of injustice and evil, to dedicate ourselves to freedom at home and abroad. Students in metropolitan D.C. are incensed at the policy of "Constructive Engagement" by our government and the role that corporations play in South Africa, as well as at the U.S. government’s mining the harbors of Nicaragua and financing the Contras. The leaflet says South Africa should be isolated; it is the most vivid example of a government's warfare against its own people since Hitler's Nazi Germany. Nations, organizations, and individuals which voluntarily interact with South Africa are collaborators with apartheid. In 1976 (Soweto), 1980 and again in 1984 thousands of South African students boycotted classes to protest apartheid education; the police responded to these peaceful protests by shooting and killing unarmed children. The settler colonial government acts as a sub-imperialist power in the Southern African region, holding the countries of Angola, Botswana, Lesotho, Mozambique, Namibia, Swaziland, Zambia and Zimbabwe economic hostage while it trains and finances counter revolutionaries. The leaflet mentions legalized racism, economic exploitation, inferior hospitals, a passbook, a computer network, the apartheid economy, cheap labor, Ford, General Motors (GM), Mobil Oil, economic and military self- sufficiency, and the African "township" Soweto.
Collection: Kathleen McShea Erville papers