DEMONSTRATION PROTESTING LATEST WAVE OF REPRESSION IN SOUTH AFRICA

by Student Coalition Against Racism, United People's Campaign Against Apartheid and Racism
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
November 2, 1977
Publisher: Student Coalition Against Racism, United People's Campaign against Apartheid and Racism
1 page
Type: Press Release
Coverage in Africa: South Africa
Coverage outside Africa: United States
Language: English
Press release about a demonstration at Philadelphia City Hall on November 5 protesting the latest wave of repression in South Africa. Speakers will be Godfrey Sithole of the African National Congress (ANC) and Michael Simmons of UPCAAR. The sudden, sweeping crackdown against nonviolent opposition to apartheid and racial oppression has drawn protest from around the world. "Banning" has been the main tool used against white opponents to apartheid, while Blacks have been imprisoned. As the deaths of Steven Biko and at least 20 less publicized political prisoners in the past 18 months indicate, arrest in South Africa can be tantamount to a death sentence. The press release says while the Carter administration has now agreed to an arms embargo -- at this point limited to six months -- it fails to acknowledge the major role played in the continuation of apartheid by over 400 American banks and corporations doing business in South Africa. These investments have enabled the white minority government to remain in power and to finance 25 years of repression against the Black majority. The press release calls for: denial of tax credits to U.S. companies which invest in South Africa; tax disincentives to reduce U.S. investment there; elimination of Export-Import Bank guarantees for loans to U.S. companies trading and investing in South Africa; immediate placement of economic and diplomatic sanctions on South Africa; and the immediate end of apartheid and institution of majority rule in South Africa.
Used by permission of a former member of United People’s Campaign Against Apartheid and Racism.
Collection: Vincent Klingler papers