STATEMENT ON THE NEED FOR NATIONAL PROGRAMMATIC UNITY

by United People's Campaign Against Apartheid and Racism
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
Undated, apparently 1977, month not known
Publisher: United People's Campaign against Apartheid and Racism
5 pages
Statement submitted by the United Peoples Campaign Against Apartheid and Racism calling for debate and discussion on the need for national programmatic unity in the U.S. movement, proposed for adoption by the National Coalition for the Liberation of Southern Africa. Throughout the world, struggles for independence, national liberation and against imperialism are mounting a fierce threat to Western corporate monopolies. During the 1960’s and early 70's, the focal point for that struggle was Southeast Asia. The liberation of Guinea-Bissau, Mozambique and Angola set the stage for the continuing struggle to free Zimbabwe, Namibia and South Africa. Now the struggle in Southern Africa is the focal point in the world struggle against imperialism and racism. The forces of reaction are attempting to bolster their position, and forces of liberation are on the move. In Zimbabwe, the unity of the Patriotic Front and the sharp rise in guerrilla activity has escalated the consolidation of offensive tactics by the racist regime not only against the people of Zimbabwe but also the people of Mozambique. In Namibia, the attempt to force a neo-colonial solution are being met with strong resistance from the people of Namibia and SWAPO. In South Africa, a year of unprecedented struggle after Soweto has brought home the struggle against racism and imperialism, shaking the racist Vorster regime. The struggle has particular significance in the U.S. because U.S. corporate investment in SA, Namibia and Rhodesia totals well over $4.5 billion. The statement mentions the struggle against racism, the African Liberation Support Movement, U.S. corporations, and the military.

Used by permission of a former member of United People's Campaign Against Apartheid and Racism.
Collection: Vincent Klingler papers