THE ORIGIN OF THE AFRICAN/AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY AND CULTURE CURRICULUM IN THE NEW ORLEANS PUBLIC SCHOOL SYSTEM

by Carl Galmon, Louisiana State Committee Against Apartheid
New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
September 12, 1993
Publisher: Louisiana State Committee Against Apartheid
3 pages
Coverage in Africa: South Africa, Africa
Coverage outside Africa: United States
Language: English
The document describes the troubled history of implementing an African and African American Studies curriculum in the New Orleans Public School System. It says the impetus of this effort came from a meeting honoring the 65th Anniversary of the African National Congress (ANC) held in Washington, D.C., which included the ANC, Congressional Black Caucus, and TransAfrica and other anti-apartheid activists at which Oliver Tambo, President of the A.N.C., was the keynote speaker. At a strategy workshop at this meeting, a vote was taken to demand that all educational institutions teach African/African American History and Culture throughout the nation. Dr. Gwendolyn Patton, former professor of history at Tuskegee University and currently Coordinator of the Southern Regional African Peace Coordinating Network, agreed to serve as facilitator of the Southwest Region. The Louisiana State Committee Against Apartheid and the Afro-American Liberation League, led Malcolm Suber took the lead in this effort in Orleans Parish. 
This item was digitized by the Amistad Research Center, which made it available to the African Activist Archive
See: http://www.amistadresearchcenter.org/
Collection: Amistad Research Center vertical file, Amistad Research Center