ASPECTS OF THE FORMATION OF A NAMIBIAN TRADE UNION: BACKGROUND TO THE NATIONAL UNION OF NAMIBIAN WORKERS (NUMW)

Paper presented to "Namibia, Africa's Last Colony: Problems for Freedom and Development". Conference to be held at the University of Vermont, April 4&5, 1982, Burlington, Vermont.
by Henning Melber
Burlington, Vermont, United States
April 1982
14 pages
Type: Conference Presentation
Coverage in Africa: Namibia
Coverage outside Africa: United States
Language: English
Contents: 1. Introduction • 2. Social determination for the organisation of the black working class • 3. The Historic Development of African Labour-Struggle • 4. The Organized Labour Movement and the National Liberation Struggle • LITERATURE • Appendix A • Appendix B • Paper prepared for the conference NAMIBIA, AFRICA'S LAST COLONY: PROBLEMS FOR FREEDOM AND DEVELOPMENT held at the University of Vermont, April 4&5, Burlington, Vermont. The paper includes a name that says this paper is based in major parts on an article contributed to Siegfried Mielke (ed.), Internationales Gewerkschaftshandbuch. The paper says I feel obligated to John Oxenham, who polished up the Englist text. The paper discusses the South West African People’s Organization (SWAPO), contract workers, working conditions, the oppressed, the colonial-capitalist economy, domestic servants, the fishing industry, farm labourers, black workers, the United Nations Institute for Namibia, the Damara, the Nama, the Herero, Kaokoland, Ovambo, Kavango, Caprivi, the Police Zone, independent trade unions, the Wage and Industrial Conciliation Ordinance, German colonial rule, Gross Otavi (Groß Otavi), the South West Africa Company, townships, the fish industry, the Ovamboland People's Congress (OPC), the Ovamboland People's Organization (OPO), the National Union of Namibian Workers (NUMW), the Namibian Workers Union (NAWU), and occupation. [Note: Henning Melber did not attend the conference. This was one of the background papers provided by individuals unable to attend.]
Used by permission of Henning Melber.
Collection: Elizabeth S. Landis collection, National Archives of Namibia