ECSA Bulletin

(#155)
by Episcopal Churchpeople for a Free Southern Africa
New York, New York, United States
December 10, 1994
8 pages
Contents: THE TRUTH WILL OUT • NGO SECTOR IN FUNDING CRISIS • LAND BILL PASSES • The newsletter includes excerpts from the November 15, 1994 newsletter “South African Political Update” by Laurie Adams produced by the US-SA Sister Community Project (United States - South Africa Sister Community Project) in Johannesburg. The newsletter reprints newspaper and magazine articles including: three articles for which titles are not included (by Reg Rumney, Phillip van Noekerk, and Ray Kennedy), "IFP-ANC clashes threaten local elections" by Anne Evereth, "Inkatha's Scientology Link," "MK deserters camped in Ulundi," "Armscor bought 35,000 AKs from China for Unita inquiry hears," and three articles by Karl Maier ("No joy as Captain 'Tears' comes home," "Angola's shattered spirit fails to arise," and "Ceasefire in Angola fails to stop guns"). The newsletter discusses Minister Without Portfolio Jay Naidoo, the Reconstruction and Development Programme (RDP), the public sector, business, labor, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), Work in Progress, Vrye Weekblad, Speak magazine, South magazine, Learn and Teach, the New Nation,  Black Sash, USAID, domestic workers, farmworkers, the Urban Foundation, the Consultative Business Movement, Kagiso Trust, anti-apartheid causes, European donor money, the Land Bill, the ANC (African National Congress), the National Party (NP), security forces, secret operations, groups resisting apartheid, the South African Police (SAP), a witness protection program, Lawyers for Human Rights, Brian Currin, the murder of Bheki Mlangeni, the South African Council of Churches (SACC), Vlakplaas, John Vorster Square, the security branch, Khotso House, HIV, AIDS, ANC guerrillas, the Inkatha Freedom Party (IFP), Chief Gatsha Buthelezi, a KwaZulu cabinet minister, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, secret testimony, Housing Minister Joe Slovo, Nelson Mandela, banks, redlined black areas, townships, a boycott of mortgage payments, rent, Ruth First, Chief Mangosuthu Buthelezi, aliens, jobs, illegal immigrants, Colonel Brian van Niekerk, fighting, the Human Rights Committee, Dr. Ziba Jiyane, King Goodwill Zwelithini’s peace drive, Linda McLean, Chief Mkwanazi, the Mtubatuba Committee of Concerned Residents, Safety and Security Minister Sydney Mufamadi, Chief Cebekhulu, Chief Mzimbane of Ndwelani, Business Wise, the Church of Scientology, Laurence Anthony, Ben Ngubane, Umkhonto we Sizwe (MK), Daluxolo Luthuli, Military Intelligence, the Caprivi Strip, Patrick Hlongwane, the South African National Defence Force (SANDF), a paramilitary squad, Zulu speakers, the Wallmannstal army base, Defence Minister Joe Modise, Deputy Defence Minister Ronnie Kasrils, Chief of Staff Siphiwe Nyanda, the Returned Exiles Committee, the former TVBC (Transkei, Venda, Bophuthatswana, Ciskei) states, SACP (South African Communist Party), COSATU, rifles, heavy weapons, the South African Defence Force (SADF), Eli Wazen, Anwar Shaalan, Eastern Discovery SA, Tielman De Waal, the Cameron Commission, rebel movements in Angola and Mozambique, Greg Mills, AK-47s, South Africa's 32 battalion, Koevoet, Marius Vermaak, peace in Angola, Caala, Captain Elias Chivuka, Jonas Savimbi, the National Union for the Total Independence of Angola (UNITA), President Jose Eduardo does Santos, Manuel Joaquim da Silva, the Angolan Armed Forces (FAA), Huambo, Cuito, the Benguela Railway, Zaire, Zambia, the Popular Movement for the Liberation of Angola (MPLA), relief food, the UN World Food Programme, the International Committee of the Red Cross, Virgilio Farinha, a Coca-Cola factory, Maria Isabel Wasovava, Horacio Tito, Luanda, Médecins Sans Frontiéres (Doctors Without Borders), Western aid officials, soldiers, the Lusaka protocol, Alioune Blondin Beye, demobilization of troops, a UN peacekeeping force, Rafael Lopes, the Angolan Air Force, a Russian-built M-17 helicopter, Cuito Cuanavale, the UN Verification Mission in Angola (Unavem), and UN Secretary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali.
Used by permission of former board members of the Episcopal Churchpeople for a Free Southern Africa.
Collection: Elizabeth S. Landis collection, National Archives of Namibia