OBSERVE U.N. DAY TO END RACISM/APARTHEID, COMMEMORATE SHARPEVILLE COME TO NOON RALLY AGAINST POLAROID/SOUTH AFRICA

by Polaroid Revolutionary Workers Movement
Boston, Massachusetts, United States
March 1971
1 page
Type: Leaflet
Coverage in Africa: South Africa
Coverage outside Africa: United States, United Nations
Language: English
Leaflet advertising a rally against Polaroid Corporation on March 22, 1971. The event will commemorate the peaceful protest on March 21, 1960in the township of Sharpeville by 5,000 Africans against the pass system. Every black South African must carry an identification card and produce it on demand to any policeman or one of several other classes of white officials. The leaflet says passage of the Suppression of Communism Act, the Terrorism Act and similar laws has turned South Africa into a police state. After Sharpeville, world opinion against the apartheid regime was so great that the UN urged economic sanctions against South Africa, but U.S. business investment there has more than doubled in the past ten years. Polaroid equipment, including the ID-2 system, is used almost exclusively to make the South African identification pass books, thus fostering the practice of apartheid. In October, 1970, some employees of Polaroid in Cambridge, Mass. began to question Polaroid's complicity with apartheid and made demands to terminate all sales to South Africa; one employee was dismissed. A boycott of Polaroid products is in effect until it withdraws from South Africa. Polaroid's distributor in South Africa, Frank and Hirsch Co., stated that it would continue to sell Polaroid equipment to the South African government, army, and air force. [Note: the original document that was digitized has nothing on the reverse side.]
Used by permission of Caroline Hunter, co-founder of the Polaroid Revolutionary Workers Movement.
Collection: Boston Coalition for the Liberation of Southern Africa, Michigan State University Libraries Special Collections