UPDATE IV: GUIDELINES FOR AMNESTY AND INDEMNITY FOR POLITICAL OFFENDERS

SOUTH AFRICA IN TRANSITION
by Gay J. McDougall, Carl E. S. Soderbergh, Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights Under Law
Washington, DC, United States
December 11, 1990
Publisher: Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights Under Law
21 pages
Type: Report
Coverage in Africa: South Africa
Coverage outside Africa: United States
Language: English
Contents: I. Background • II. Definition of "Political Prisoner" and "Political Offense" • III. Procedures • III.A. Indemnity From Future Prosecution • III.B. Indemnity For Those On Trial • III.C. Release of Detainees • III.D. Pardon For Political Prisoners • IV. Timetable • The report says on November 2, 1990, the South African Minister of Justice, Kobie Coetsee, released two documents for publication: the long-awaited official Guidelines for releasing political prisoners and granting indemnity to others for their political activities, and the second report of the Working Group established under the Groote Schuur Minute, May 4, 1990. These documents are the most recent products of talks between the South African government and the African National congress (ANC) addressing fulfilling the preconditions set by the ANC and the international community to full-scale negotiations. The report discusses Guidelines for Defining Political Offences in South Africa, F.W. de Klerk, the Pan-Africanist Congress (PAC), the South African Communist party (SACP), the death penalty, the armed struggle, the Internal Security Act, treason, anti-apartheid activity, the 32nd Battalion, FNLA, the Department of Home Affairs, the Attorney General, prosecutions, the Human Rights Commission, homelands, Nelson Mandela, government death squads, white right-wing terrorist groups, indemnity, release from prison, confession, the State of Emergency, the Emergency Regulations, the South African Bureau of Prisons, political crimes, common law, remission of sentence, the Prisons Act, the South Africa Constitution Act, and the Pretoria Minute.
Used by permission of Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights Under Law.
Collection: Private collection of David Wiley and Christine Root