OIL TANKERS TO SOUTH AFRICA 1980 – 1981

(Summary version)
by Shipping Research Bureau
Amsterdam, Netherlands
June 17, 1982
19 pages
The report says if every one of the 52 ships considered to be the "most likely" to have made deliveries actually delivered a full cargo of crude oil to South Africa, then together they supplied over 10 million tons of crude oil, equivalent to about half of South Africa's estimated crude oil imports during the eighteen-month period under consideration. The report says the three oil companies (that is, companies owning the oil cargoes carried by ships but not necessarily owning or managing the ships themselves) which appear to be the most involved in the oil trade with South Africa, according to analysis of the 52 cases mentioned above, are Shell, Transworld Oil, and Vital; all three of these companies are partly or wholly based in the Netherlands. The report says the three shipping companies (that is, companies owning or managing ships, but not necessarily owning the oil cargoes the ships carry), which appear to be the most involved in the oil trade with South Africa, according to analysis of the 52 cases mentioned above, are A/S Havtor (based in Norway}, A.P. Moller (based in Denmark), and Shell Tankers (based in the Netherlands and the United Kingdom). The report says ten out of the 52 ships considered to be the "most likely" to have delivered crude oil to South Africa sailed from Brunei. The report says a further 28 out of the 52 ships over half the total -- sailed to South Africa from the Arabian Gulf, an oil-exporting region in which all countries have proclaimed an oil embargo against South Africa; this suggests that the companies linked with most or all of these ships deliberately violated the wishes of these countries. The report says the remaining 14 ships sailed directly to South Africa from oil-trans-shipping countries: 9 from the Netherlands and 5 from the Netherlands Antilles. The report says further information, and complete versions of this report, can be obtained from the Shipping Research Bureau in Amsterdam and Bernard Rivers in New York. The report discusses the United Nations Security Council, apartheid, the United Nations General Assembly, the Special Committee against Apartheid, the Holland Committee on Southern Africa, Working Group Kairos, the Organization of African Unity (OAU), the Organization of Arab Petroleum-Exporting Countries (OAPEC), Brussels, Jane Stove, British Petroleum (BP), Kaiser Corp., Petromed, the Sash of Iran, and OPEC (the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries). • CHAPTER 1 SUMMARY OF PRINCIPLE FINDINGS • BACKGROUND INFORMATION • The oil embargo against South Africa • Improving the oil embargo; the role of the Shipping Research Bureau • The OAPEC Resolution • Actions in Western countries • The stages in the preparation of this report • Table 1 Initial breakdown of the ships capable of carrying crude oil which have been identified as having called at South Africa between January 1980 and June 1981 • Table 2 The oil companies which apparently owned the presumed oil cargo on board each of the 52 ships considered to be the "most likely" to have delivered crude oil to South Africa • Table 3 The shipping companies which were the managers, apparent beneficial owners, and charterers of the 52 ships considered to be the "most likely" to have delivered crude oil to South Africa • Table 4 The countries in which are based those companies that are linked with the 52 ships •considered to be the "most likely" to have delivered crude oil to South Africa, and the countries whose flags were used by these ships at the times in question • Table 5 The countries or regions which were visited immediately prior to sailing to South Africa by the 52 ships considered to be the "most likely" to have delivered crude oil to South Africa • CONTENTS • APPENDICES • LIST OF TABLES
Collection: George M. Houser (Africa collection), Michigan State University Libraries Special Collections