REPORT BY EDGAR LOCKWOOD ON HIS TRIP TO THE FRONTLINE STATES, LONDON AND GENEVA, OCTOBER 3 - NOVEMBER 10, 1978

by Edgar Lockwood, Washington Office on Africa
Washington, DC, United States
November 28, 1978
Publisher: Washington Office on Africa
13 pages
Type: Report
Coverage in Africa: Mozambique, Zimbabwe, Botswana, Nigeria, Tanzania
Coverage outside Africa: United States, Switzerland, United Kingdom
Language: English
Lockwood says he arrived in Mozambique just after President Carter had granted a visa to Ian Smith and his government. Lockwood’s report discusses the Patriotic Front, Frelimo, Muzorewa, Sithole, Kaunda and Michel, as well as the TAZARA railway. Lockwood says that, on August 14, Nkomo, Smith, and the former Nigerian Foreign Minister, Commissioner Garba, had met, without the knowledge of Mugabe, to discuss the possibility of a settlement by bringing the Patriotic Front into the internal settlement. The report says Mozambique believes that, when the IMF granted its loan to Zambia, opening the border to the south and reintegrating the Zambian economy with Rhodesia and South Africa was one of the conditions. Lockwood says he arrived in Zambia four days after the heavy Rhodesian attack on ZAPU camps. Zimbabwean refugees are now concentrated in three camps: Tronga in Sofala province near Chibabava, Doroi in Manica near Chimoio, and a third in Tete province. The report discusses scholarship programs such as IUEF, African-American Institute, and Phelps-Stokes/Moton Institute. In Gaborone, Lockwood talked to Harry Nengwekhulu, a founding member of SASO. The report discusses the Black Consciousness Movement (BCM) and Tsietsi Mashinini. • THE STRUGGLE FOR ZIMBABWE • ZANU and Mozambique • The Attack by Rhodesia on ZAPU Camps in Zambia • ZAPU • The Effect of the New Western Strategy on the Patriotic Front and its Backers • Zimbabwean Refugees in Mozambique • Zimbabwe Refugees in Botswana • SOUTH AFRICAN REFUGEES IN BOTSWANA • APPENDIX
Used by permission of the Washington Office on Africa.
Collection: Private collection of David Wiley and Christine Root