THE SOUTH AFRICAN THREAT TO THE INDEPENDENCE OF BASUTOLAND, BECHUANALAND, AND SWAZILAND and a PROGRAM FOR AMERICAN ACTION

by Richard P. Stevens
March 19, 1966
17 pages
Type: Conference Presentation
Coverage in Africa: South Africa, Botswana, Lesotho, Swaziland
Coverage outside Africa: United States, United Kingdom
Language: English
Paper by Richard P. Stevens for the Seminar on American Involvement in Apartheid, March 19-21, 1966 discussing U.S. policy toward Basutoland, Bechuanaland, Swaziland, and South Africa. Stevens discusses South African Prime Minister Dr. Verwoerd and the Bantustan concept and the Tomlinson Report of 1956. Stevens points out that, while apartheid is primarily a tragedy for South Africa’s non-white majority, it also compromises the fundamental rights of its small neighbors - Basutoland, Bechuanaland, and Swaziland (which were until recently known as the British High Commission Territories). He discusses South Africa transit visa and citizens of Basutoland, Bechuanaland, and Swaziland. Stevens says that Swaziland has not benefited from its abundant natural resources such as asbestos, iron-ore, timber and good farm lands because corporate profits there are not even partly ploughed back into development. He also discusses diamond mining and the sale of water and hydroelectric power to South Africa. The report discusses Bantu education; South African students going to Basutoland, Bechuanaland, and Swaziland; and Pius XII University College.
Used by permission Richard Stevens and Africa Action (successor to the American Committee on Africa).
Collection: Private collection of David Wiley and Christine Root